Recent News

Trump Uses Mount Rushmore Speech to Deliver Divisive Culture War Message

Down in the polls and failing to control a raging pandemic, the president cast himself as waging battle against a “new far-left fascism” that imperils American values and seeks to erase history.

Life on the Vice-Presidential Short List

It’s exciting. It can also feel like a colonoscopy.

Beyond Broadway, the Show Does Go On

Watching through windshields. Audiences of two. An elbow bump instead of a kiss. Theaters across the country find novel ways to play in a pandemic.

Coronavirus Live Updates: Latest News and Analysis

With the pandemic’s economic fallout lingering, vulnerable tenants are facing eviction. And the virus threatens to make the Caribbean’s hurricane season even more perilous.

This Year’s Summer Campground: Our Bedrooms and Living Rooms

Summer camp in the pandemic looks just like a screen. But what happens when kids run away from the computer?

South Korea Quarantine Hotel Is Targeted by Angry (and Noisy) Protesters

At one South Korean hotel, hundreds of quarantined foreigners are enduring noisy daily protests from local residents, who want them out.

In North Korea, Coronavirus Hurts Like No Sanctions Could

Closing the border with China crippled the regime’s few remaining methods, legal and otherwise, for bringing in much-needed foreign currency.

New Trump Appointee Puts Global Internet Freedom at Risk, Critics Say

A battle involving Michael Pack and a U.S.-funded tech group revolves around software from Falun Gong, the secretive, anti-Beijing spiritual movement with pro-Trump elements.
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Business and Economics

Smithsonian’s Leader Says ‘Museums Have a Social Justice Role to Play’

Lonnie Bunch, who oversees a host of museums and libraries, says the role of cultural institutions is to make people “feel comfortable with nuance and complexity.”

Why College Students May Qualify for Special Covid Pandemic Aid

While traditional unemployment insurance usually leaves out students, they may be eligible for federal pandemic aid. But some states don’t make it easy to get.

European Workers Draw Paychecks. American Workers Scrounge for Food.

In the pandemic, the United States has relied on expanded unemployment benefits, while European governments have subsidized wages, avoiding a surge in joblessness.

Hedge Fund’s Run at Tribune Publishing Ends With a New Board Seat

Journalists have been wary of Alden Global Capital, which is known for gutting newsrooms to eke out profits from struggling publications.

Anders Ericsson, Psychologist and ‘Expert on Experts,’ Dies at 72

His research helped inspire “Outliers,” Malcolm Gladwell’s best-selling book on the keys to excelling.

11 of Our Best Weekend Reads

The tragic history of “I can’t breathe.” Why you can have a kid or a job right now, not both. How Brooklyn Drill went global. Farewell, Carl Reiner. And more.

European Workers Draw Paychecks. American Workers Scrounge for Food.

In the pandemic, the United States has relied on expanded unemployment benefits, while European governments have subsidized wages, avoiding a surge in joblessness.

Hedge Fund’s Run at Tribune Publishing Ends With a New Board Seat

Journalists have been wary of Alden Global Capital, which is known for gutting newsrooms to eke out profits from struggling publications.
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Books and Authors

Days in the Life of Tetsuya Noda

Born in 1940, Tetsuya Noda, one of Japan’s foremost print artists, began keeping illustrated diaries as a young boy, drawing and writing about growing up in the small town of Uki, on Kyushu, the southernmost of Japan’s main islands. Spurred by a friend’s discovery that mimeograph machines, largely consigned to secretarial tasks, could be used to turn photographs into stencils for printmaking, Noda returned to his childhood practice of making art about his life.

Fiction and Responsibility

The Gringa, a recent novel by Andrew Altschul, raises an important question: Does fiction, particularly fiction that claims to be based on history, have any responsibilities at all vis-à-vis real people and their lives, places they inhabit, truth? At a time when systematic disinformation campaigns are abetting the rise of authoritarian governments the world over, might it be unwise to discard all concepts of boundaries or dividing lines between the imaginative freedom of literary fiction and distortion or falsehood?

‘The Most Ignorant and Unfit’: What Made America’s Worst Ever Leader?

Alexander Hamilton observed that “the only path to a subversion of the republican system of the Country is by flattering the prejudices of the people, and exciting their jealousies and apprehensions, to throw affairs into confusion, and bring on civil commotion.” Trump is a sign that we as a nation have lost our way. A confusion of celebrity for leadership, fame for accomplishment, and popularity for genius has given us, just as Hamilton warned, “a man unprincipled in private life desperate in his fortune.” November’s election is a judgment day for this nation’s form of republican government. Else, only “civil commotion” awaits us.

It is a Choice (because Kanye)

The rapper chooses his vacancies. Room does not choose the rapper. The rapper walked into rooms. or were dragged into rooms. were dragged into rooms. Or we walked into rooms. The seating charts of airplanes look like the Middle Passage. Then we boarded the plane. were dragged onto the plane. The plane was dragged from […]

Israel’s Annexation Plan, a New Era in Palestinian Resistance

Disenchanted with their official leadership, Palestinians in the Occupied Territories, Israel, and the diaspora are increasingly redefining their struggle away from what they believe is the two-state mirage and toward resisting the one-state reality. Rather than settling for symbols of statehood and pockets of Palestinian autonomy, their starting point is Israel’s exclusive sovereignty over all the land from the river to the sea, and their focus is the Israeli government: the fact that it provides civil and political rights to Jews that are withheld from Palestinians, in varying degrees depending on their location.

The Rose

At some point I realized the questions were the same questions. I’m studying implicit race bias in toddlers. I’m tracking the advent of the credit economy. The implication for folk music of the fact that stars don’t twinkle—the apparent perturbation of stars is just a fluctuation in the medium—is something we want to understand. We […]

Wanting Wrong

The narrator of Miranda Popkey’s first novel, Topics of Conversation, is the daughter of an old Hollywood family, now in gentle decline. Her nice, white life “was going to be suburban, it was going to be upper-middle-class,” but she throws all that into disarray when she decides to leave her husband, John, who loves her. She does this despite the fact that he was “so kind and so supportive and emotionally generous and a good listener...everything a liberated woman is supposed to want.” Her remorse is partly political: How can a woman refuse all that for herself, when it is exactly what she wants for women in general? Her regret is also, in part, simply human—she does not love a man who loves her, and the pain he feels when she leaves him makes her feel badly about herself.

A Shuttered Garage, a Devastated Trade

The taxi industry has been brutally crunched on two sides—from skyrocketing operating costs, on the one hand, and a sharp decline in business, on the other. When the bubble burst in late 2014, the value of medallions crashed, leaving drivers with no savings and deep in debt. A rash of suicides among them has followed. At the same time, those already struggling to repay loans found their income drastically reduced by competition from Uber and other ridesharing companies. Erick Castro is left shaking his head, wondering why one of the city’s most faithful and enduring modes of transportation has been the one to go.
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United States

Coronavirus Live Updates: Latest News and Analysis


With the pandemic’s economic fallout lingering, vulnerable tenants are facing eviction. And the virus threatens to make the Caribbean’s hurricane season even more perilous..
 
New York Times
   
 

Beyond Broadway, the Show Does Go On


Watching through windshields. Audiences of two. An elbow bump instead of a kiss. Theaters across the country find novel ways to play in a pandemic..
 
New York Times
   
 

Life on the Vice-Presidential Short List


It’s exciting. It can also feel like a colonoscopy..
 
New York Times
   
 

Trump Uses Mount Rushmore Speech to Deliver Divisive Culture War Message


Down in the polls and failing to control a raging pandemic, the president cast himself as waging battle against a “new far-left fascism” that imperils American values and seeks to erase history.
 
New York Times
   
 

Virus Surges in Arizona but the Rodeo Goes on


A former state official called what has happened in Arizona “a story of missed opportunities.” Hospital beds in the state are filling up.
 
New York Times
   
 

‘They Have Lost Control’: Why Minneapolis Burned


After George Floyd’s death, pent-up frustrations, provocateurs and inexperienced leadership led to mayhem for three nights.
 
New York Times
   
 

Rudolfo Anaya, a Father of Chicano Literature, Dies at 82


His coming-of-age novel “Bless Me, Ultima” reframed the way many in New Mexico viewed their own history, even as school districts tried to ban it.
 
New York Times
   
 

U.S. Coronavirus Cases Are Rising Sharply, but Deaths Are Still Down


This seemingly counterintuitive trend might not last, experts said. But the nation can still learn from the decline..
 
New York Times
   
 

Why Are Fireworks Going Off Every Night in California?


It’s unclear if the problem is worse this year but complaints are on the rise in parts of California.
 
New York Times
   
 

Mary Trump Fights Effort to Bar Publication of Her Book


Mary Trump and her lawyer filed documents questioning the validity of the nondisclosure agreement she signed, saying it was based on fraud and was too broad to be enforced.
 
New York Times
   
 

Coronavirus Live Updates: Latest News and Analysis

With the pandemic’s economic fallout lingering, vulnerable tenants are facing eviction. And the virus threatens to make the Caribbean’s hurricane season even more perilous..
 
New York Times
   
 

Beyond Broadway, the Show Does Go On

Watching through windshields. Audiences of two. An elbow bump instead of a kiss. Theaters across the country find novel ways to play in a pandemic..
 
New York Times
   
 

Life on the Vice-Presidential Short List

It’s exciting. It can also feel like a colonoscopy..
 
New York Times
   
 

Trump Uses Mount Rushmore Speech to Deliver Divisive Culture War Message

Down in the polls and failing to control a raging pandemic, the president cast himself as waging battle against a “new far-left fascism” that imperils American values and seeks to erase history.
 
New York Times
   
 

Virus Surges in Arizona but the Rodeo Goes on

A former state official called what has happened in Arizona “a story of missed opportunities.” Hospital beds in the state are filling up.
 
New York Times
   
 

‘They Have Lost Control’: Why Minneapolis Burned

After George Floyd’s death, pent-up frustrations, provocateurs and inexperienced leadership led to mayhem for three nights.
 
New York Times
   
 

Rudolfo Anaya, a Father of Chicano Literature, Dies at 82

His coming-of-age novel “Bless Me, Ultima” reframed the way many in New Mexico viewed their own history, even as school districts tried to ban it.
 
New York Times
   
 

U.S. Coronavirus Cases Are Rising Sharply, but Deaths Are Still Down

This seemingly counterintuitive trend might not last, experts said. But the nation can still learn from the decline..
 
New York Times
   
 

Why Are Fireworks Going Off Every Night in California?

It’s unclear if the problem is worse this year but complaints are on the rise in parts of California.
 
New York Times
   
 

Mary Trump Fights Effort to Bar Publication of Her Book

Mary Trump and her lawyer filed documents questioning the validity of the nondisclosure agreement she signed, saying it was based on fraud and was too broad to be enforced.
 
New York Times
   
 

World

New Trump Appointee Puts Global Internet Freedom at Risk, Critics Say


A battle involving Michael Pack and a U.S.-funded tech group revolves around software from Falun Gong, the secretive, anti-Beijing spiritual movement with pro-Trump elements.
 
New York Times
   
 

In North Korea, Coronavirus Hurts Like No Sanctions Could


Closing the border with China crippled the regime’s few remaining methods, legal and otherwise, for bringing in much-needed foreign currency.
 
New York Times
   
 

South Korea Quarantine Hotel Is Targeted by Angry (and Noisy) Protesters


At one South Korean hotel, hundreds of quarantined foreigners are enduring noisy daily protests from local residents, who want them out.
 
New York Times
   
 

Sorting Out Canada’s Patchwork of Face Mask Rules


Without general directives from federal and provincial governments, local leaders have been left setting mask directives.
 
New York Times
   
 

Saroj Khan, Choreographer Who Made Bollywood Sparkle, Dies at 71


Beginning in the industry as a child actress, Ms. Khan went on to choreograph some of the most memorable performances of the 1980s and ’90s..
 
New York Times
   
 

Russia Denies Paying Bounties, but Some Say the U.S. Had It Coming


Russia’s grievances against what it sees as American bullying and expansion into its own zones of influence have been stacking up for decades.
 
New York Times
   
 

Turkey Convicts Human Rights Activists on Terror Charges


The cases are part of a widespread effort to quash dissent in the country, which has seen dozens of activists put on trial after a failed 2016 coup attempt.
 
New York Times
   
 

As Neo-Nazis Seed Military Ranks, Germany Confronts ‘an Enemy Within’


After plastic explosives and Nazi memorabilia were found at an elite soldier’s home, Germany worries about a problem of far-right infiltration at the heart of its democracy.
 
New York Times
   
 

George Floyd’s Killing Prompts Africans to Call for Police Reform at Home


Africans are increasingly pushing to hold police agencies to account and “decolonize” the repressive institutions they inherited from colonial rulers.
 
New York Times
   
 

Duterte Signs Antiterrorism Bill in Philippines Despite Widespread Criticism


Human rights groups say the new law will give the police and military forces more powers to stifle dissent.
 
New York Times
   
 

New Trump Appointee Puts Global Internet Freedom at Risk, Critics Say


A battle involving Michael Pack and a U.S.-funded tech group revolves around software from Falun Gong, the secretive, anti-Beijing spiritual movement with pro-Trump elements.
 
New York Times
   
 

In North Korea, Coronavirus Hurts Like No Sanctions Could


Closing the border with China crippled the regime’s few remaining methods, legal and otherwise, for bringing in much-needed foreign currency.
 
New York Times
   
 

South Korea Quarantine Hotel Is Targeted by Angry (and Noisy) Protesters


At one South Korean hotel, hundreds of quarantined foreigners are enduring noisy daily protests from local residents, who want them out.
 
New York Times
   
 

Sorting Out Canada’s Patchwork of Face Mask Rules


Without general directives from federal and provincial governments, local leaders have been left setting mask directives.
 
New York Times
   
 

Saroj Khan, Choreographer Who Made Bollywood Sparkle, Dies at 71


Beginning in the industry as a child actress, Ms. Khan went on to choreograph some of the most memorable performances of the 1980s and ’90s..
 
New York Times
   
 

Russia Denies Paying Bounties, but Some Say the U.S. Had It Coming


Russia’s grievances against what it sees as American bullying and expansion into its own zones of influence have been stacking up for decades.
 
New York Times
   
 

Turkey Convicts Human Rights Activists on Terror Charges


The cases are part of a widespread effort to quash dissent in the country, which has seen dozens of activists put on trial after a failed 2016 coup attempt.
 
New York Times
   
 

As Neo-Nazis Seed Military Ranks, Germany Confronts ‘an Enemy Within’


After plastic explosives and Nazi memorabilia were found at an elite soldier’s home, Germany worries about a problem of far-right infiltration at the heart of its democracy.
 
New York Times
   
 

George Floyd’s Killing Prompts Africans to Call for Police Reform at Home


Africans are increasingly pushing to hold police agencies to account and “decolonize” the repressive institutions they inherited from colonial rulers.
 
New York Times
   
 

Duterte Signs Antiterrorism Bill in Philippines Despite Widespread Criticism


Human rights groups say the new law will give the police and military forces more powers to stifle dissent.
 
New York Times
   
 

Business & Economics

European Workers Draw Paychecks. American Workers Scrounge for Food.


In the pandemic, the United States has relied on expanded unemployment benefits, while European governments have subsidized wages, avoiding a surge in joblessness.
 
New York Times
   
 

11 of Our Best Weekend Reads


The tragic history of “I can’t breathe.” Why you can have a kid or a job right now, not both. How Brooklyn Drill went global. Farewell, Carl Reiner. And more..
 
New York Times
   
 

James Sherwood, Who Revived the Orient Express, Dies at 86


A multimillionaire by 36, he also bought Cipriani in Venice, the “21” Club in New York, Harry’s Bar in London and dozens of grand hotels.
 
New York Times
   
 

Why College Students May Qualify for Special Covid Pandemic Aid


While traditional unemployment insurance usually leaves out students, they may be eligible for federal pandemic aid. But some states don’t make it easy to get..
 
New York Times
   
 

For Maine Lobstermen, a Perfect Storm Threatens the Summer Season


The state’s lobster industry, already struggling before the virus, could be crippled as tourism dries up, leaving boatloads of crustaceans and no one to eat them.
 
New York Times
   
 

A Beverly Hills Hotel, Bought With Looted Money, Goes on Sale


The Viceroy L’Ermitage Beverly Hills was owned by a fugitive financier involved in a $2.5 billion fraud. Interested? It’ll cost north of $100 million..
 
New York Times
   
 

Hedge Fund’s Run at Tribune Publishing Ends With a New Board Seat


Journalists have been wary of Alden Global Capital, which is known for gutting newsrooms to eke out profits from struggling publications.
 
New York Times
   
 

Essence Names Interim Chief After Claim of ‘Abusive Work Culture’


An anonymous post on Medium that said it was written by current and former Essence employees is part of a social media campaign for change at the groundbreaking Black media brand.
 
New York Times
   
 

Boeing’s 737 Max is Being Readied for a Comeback. What Travelers Need to Know


The plane has been grounded since March 2019 after two deadly crashes, but could fly again by the end of the year. Answers to questions about the process..
 
New York Times
   
 

Florida State University Child Care Policy Draws Backlash


The university sent an email to its employees last week saying they would no longer be able to care for children while working remotely. After a backlash, the university clarified its policy..
 
New York Times
   
 

Science & Technology

MIT-designed robot can disinfect a warehouse floor in 30 minutes — and could one day be employed in grocery stores and schools

MIT has designed a robot that is capable of disinfecting the floor of a 4,000-square foot warehouse in only half an hour, and it could one day be used to clean your local grocery store or school.
 
CNN.com - RSS Channel - App Tech Section
   
 

This Year’s Summer Campground: Our Bedrooms and Living Rooms


Summer camp in the pandemic looks just like a screen. But what happens when kids run away from the computer?.
 
Nellie Bowles
   
 

Kobe Bryant will be memorialized on the cover of NBA 2K21

Kobe Bryant is being memorialized on the cover of the video game NBA 2K21.
 
CNN.com - RSS Channel - App Tech Section
   
 

‘Animal Crossing,’ a Nintendo Switch bestseller, now lets you go swimming

The waters of "Animal Crossing: New Horizons" are finally opening up: In the hit Nintendo Switch game's latest update, players can go swimming starting Friday.
 
CNN.com - RSS Channel - App Tech Section
   
 

Twitter may let you edit your tweets — but everyone needs to wear a mask first

Twitter teased a much-anticipated innovation on Thursday — but it comes with a catch.
 
CNN.com - RSS Channel - App Tech Section
   
 

Twitter is removing ‘master,’ ‘slave’ and ‘blacklist’ from its code

The language of computing is changing in the wake of the death of George Floyd.
 
CNN.com - RSS Channel - App Tech Section
   
 

What Hong Kong’s Pandemic Experience Taught Uber About Other Cities


The city was among the first to close and among the first to reopen. But Uber’s lessons there could be difficult to duplicate elsewhere..
 
Kate Conger and Tiffany May
   
 

Amazon and Microsoft stopped working with police on facial recognition. For others it’s still big business

As Black Lives Matter protests swept across the United States, IBM, Amazon and Microsoft took a stand: They halted sales of facial recognition technology to American police departments, and called on the government to regulate the powerful emerging technology.
 
CNN.com - RSS Channel - App Tech Section
   
 

The #Vanlife Business Is Booming


Coronavirus is just a distant memory while zipping around in a several-hundred-thousand-dollar custom van on the open road.
 
Nellie Bowles
   
 

CNN.com – RSS Channel – App Tech Section 1970-01-01 00:00:00

As Twitter begins to crack down on some of President Trump's tweets, some Republicans have started flocking to a new social media app, "Parler." CNN's Tom Foreman reports.
 
CNN.com - RSS Channel - App Tech Section
   
 

Law & Public Policy

Breaking News

SCOTUS holds that bankruptcy court’s denial of debtor’s repayment plan is not immediately appealable. No more opinions for two weeks. The post . .
 
Andrew Hamm
   
 

Breaking News

The 1 and only, per J. Thomas: Petitioners’ lawsuit is not barred by the Tax Injunction Act. The post . .
 
Andrew Hamm
   
 

Breaking news

ed cert. in two cases:  Ocasio v United States, on extortion conspiracy, and Hawkins v Community Bank of Raymore, on spousal guarantors on credit applications. The post . .
 
Andrew Hamm
   
 

Breaking News

The opinion in . The Court rejects prosecution of fisherman for discarding undersized fish, 5-4. The opinion in . The Court rejects state action antitrust immunity for NC Dental Board because it isn’t supervised enough by state government, 6-3.   The post . .
 
Andrew Hamm
   
 

Breaking News

The opinion in .   The post .
 
Andrew Hamm
   
 

Breaking News

The orders are . There are no new grants or CVSGs. The post . .
 
Andrew Hamm
   
 

Breaking News

The orders are . There are no new grants or CVSGs. The decision in . The post . .
 
Andrew Hamm
   
 

Breaking News

The opinion in . Per J. Sotomayor, trademark tacking is a jury question. The opinion in . Per J. Ginsburg, dismissal of an action in multidistrict litigation triggers a right to appeal. The opinion in .
 
Andrew Hamm
   
 

Breaking News

The orders list is . There are no new grants or CVSGs. Review denied on battlefield contractors and generic drugs. The opinion in ; prison may not prohibit 1/2 inch beard compelled by religious beliefs. The summary reversal in Christesen, a capital case, is . The opinion in .
 
Andrew Hamm
   
 

Breaking News

The opinion in The Court holds that localities must explain denials of permission to build cell phone towers. The opinion in . The Court holds that a habeas petitioner who wins does not have to file notice of appeal to preserve winning theory on appeal.   The post . .
 
Andrew Hamm
   
 

Books & Authors

Days in the Life of Tetsuya Noda


Born in 1940, Tetsuya Noda, one of Japan’s foremost print artists, began keeping illustrated diaries as a young boy, drawing and writing about growing up in the small town of Uki, on Kyushu, the southernmost of Japan’s main islands.
 
Eve Sneider
   
 

Fiction and Responsibility


The Gringa, a recent novel by Andrew Altschul, raises an important question: Does fiction, particularly fiction that claims to be based on history, have any responsibilities at all vis-à-vis real people and their lives, places they inhabit, truth? At a time when systematic disinformation campaigns are abetting the rise of authoritarian governments the world over, might it be unwise to discard all concepts of boundaries or dividing lines between the imaginative freedom of literary fiction and distortion or falsehood?
 
Esther Allen
   
 

‘The Most Ignorant and Unfit’: What Made America’s Worst Ever Leader?


Alexander Hamilton observed that “the only path to a subversion of the republican system of the Country is by flattering the prejudices of the people, and exciting their jealousies and apprehensions, to throw affairs into confusion, and bring on civil commotion.” Trump is a sign that we as a nation have lost our way.
 
David Rothkopf
   
 

It is a Choice (because Kanye)


The rapper chooses his vacancies. Room does not choose the rapper. The rapper walked into rooms. or were dragged into rooms. were dragged into rooms. Or we walked into rooms.
 
francine j. harris
   
 

Wanting Wrong


The narrator of Miranda Popkey’s first novel, Topics of Conversation, is the daughter of an old Hollywood family, now in gentle decline. Her nice, white life “was going to be suburban, it was going to be upper-middle-class,” but she throws all that into disarray when she decides to leave her husband, John, who loves her.
 
Anne Enright
   
 

The Rose


At some point I realized the questions were the same questions. I’m studying implicit race bias in toddlers. I’m tracking the advent of the credit economy. The implication for folk music of the fact that stars don’t twinkle—the apparent perturbation of stars is just a fluctuation in the medium—is something we want to understand.
 
Ben Lerner
   
 

Israel’s Annexation Plan, a New Era in Palestinian Resistance


Disenchanted with their official leadership, Palestinians in the Occupied Territories, Israel, and the diaspora are increasingly redefining their struggle away from what they believe is the two-state mirage and toward resisting the one-state reality.
 
Tareq Baconi
   
 

A Shuttered Garage, a Devastated Trade


The taxi industry has been brutally crunched on two sides—from skyrocketing operating costs, on the one hand, and a sharp decline in business, on the other. When the bubble burst in late 2014, the value of medallions crashed, leaving drivers with no savings and deep in debt.
 
Willa Glickman, Phil Penman
   
 

He Made Stone Speak


Because all creative people start out as young people, we have a tendency to ascribe creativity to youth itself, but mature masters like Michelangelo remind us that the urge to create has nothing to do with age or the lack of it, but rather with that inventive spirit both he and Vasari called ingegno—inborn wit, cleverness, genius.
 
Ingrid D. Rowland
   
 

The Films of Women’s Liberation


An exceptional series currently streaming on the Criterion Channel, “Tell Me: Women Filmmakers, Women’s Stories,” is an occasion to reconsider the ranging paths of feminist media production stoked by women’s liberation in the early 1970s.
 
Phoebe Chen
   
 

Articles & Opinion

How the NYPD Weaponized a Curfew Against Protesters and Residents

Husan Blue, his family, and his neighbors were having a cookout on the patio outside their apartment in Crown Heights. It was a warm summer night in Brooklyn. Little kids were running around and playing.
 
Ryan Devereaux
   
 

How Trump’s Deportation Flights Are Putting Latin America and the Caribbean at Risk

Jude said his body ached, and he was feverish. The 40-year-old was being held with dozens of other Haitians in a crowded U.S.
 
Melissa del Bosque
   
 

How the Fed Bailed Out the Investor Class Without Spending a Cent

March 23, 2020 was a critical day in U.S. history, though at the time it felt like another 24 hours on the road to pandemic apocalypse.
 
David Dayen
   
 

Amid Allegations of Sexual Impropriety, Excessive Drinking, and Power Politics, a Veterans Group Wages Civil War

Aprominent veterans’ group doing relief work on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic has quietly gone to war with itself in federal court, with two branches of the organization suing each other amid allegations of sexual misconduct at an alcohol-fueled retreat last summer. Founded in 2010, Team Rubicon mobilizes military veterans and other volunteers skilled as first responders to do disaster relief.
 
Alex Emmons
   
 

Under Cover of Mass Death, Andrew Cuomo Calls in the Billionaires to Build a High-Tech Dystopia

For a few fleeting moments during New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s daily coronavirus briefing on Wednesday, the somber grimace that has filled our screens for weeks was briefly replaced by something resembling a smile. “We are ready, we’re all-in,” the governor .
 
Naomi Klein
   
 

As Africa Drowns in Garbage, the Plastic Business Keeps Booming

Rosemary Nyambura spends her weekends collecting plastic with her aunt Miriam in the Dandora dump in Nairobi. Because the bottles they sell to other plastics traders are mixed in with discarded syringes, broken glass, feces, fragments of cellphone cases, remote controls, shoe soles, trinkets, toys, pouches, clamshells, bags, and countless unrecognizable shreds of thin plastic film, the work is time-consuming and dangerous.
 
Sharon Lerner
   
 

Leaked Intelligence Cables Detail a Secret Propaganda War Between Iranian Spies and Exiled Militant Group

In a ward of Gohardasht Prison, a sprawling detention facility in a western suburb of Tehran, a few inmates gathered one night in late 2014 to remember a fallen comrade. Ali Saremi, a supporter of the Mojahedin-e Khalq, or MEK, had been executed four years earlier at another Iranian prison for his allegiance to the militant dissident group, which is considered a terrorist organization in Iran.
 
Murtaza Hussain
   
 

TikTok Told Moderators to Suppress Posts by “Ugly” People and the Poor to Attract New Users

The makers of TikTok, the Chinese video-sharing app with hundreds of millions of users around the world, instructed moderators to suppress posts created by users deemed too ugly, poor, or disabled for the platform, according to internal documents obtained by The Intercept.
 
Sam Biddle
   
 

The Secret History of U.S. Involvement in Brazil’s Scandal-Wracked Operation Car Wash

Leaked conversations between Brazilian officials reveal the inner workings of a secretive collaboration with the U.S. Department of Justice on a sprawling anti-corruption effort known as Operation Car Wash. The chats, analyzed in partnership with the Brazilian investigative news outlet Agência Pública, show that the Brazilians were extremely accommodating to their U.S.
 
Andrew Fishman
   
 

The Far Right Loves to Hate Sanders Surrogate Linda Sarsour, and She “Has the Wounds to Prove It”

On February 11, the night Bernie Sanders won the New Hampshire primary, Linda Sarsour was in Queens, New York, vying on his behalf for an endorsement from the presidential candidate. Sarsour, a Sanders campaign surrogate and executive director of Muslim social justice group , was speaking to club membership on home turf.
 
Alex Kane