Recent News

LAPD audit reveals dangers of high-tech policing

An audit of the Los Angeles police department is raising questions about new technologies law enforcement is using nationwide with little oversight.

Pinterest files to go public. Its stock ticker? PINS

Pinterest, a service that lets users bookmark or "pin" images ranging from recipes to home design, filed paperwork to go public.

This 24-year-old finds unreleased features in your favorite apps

Jane Manchun Wong spends her free time reverse engineering popular apps like Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Airbnb and others, to find new features and security vulnerabilities.

How Twitter’s algorithm is amplifying extreme political rhetoric

Through a new feature, Twitter may at times end up amplifying inflammatory political rhetoric, misinformation, conspiracy theories, and flat out lies to its users.

Tesla is accusing a former employee of stealing self-driving tech and giving it to a Chinese rival

Tesla is accusing a former employee of stealing intellectual property worth hundreds of millions of dollars and sharing it with Xiaopeng Motors.

How 5G will transform manufacturing

5G networks that transform entertainment, communication and transportation may still be years away. But in manufacturing, the technology is already making a difference.

Big banks are using AI to keep out of trouble

Doing business with the wrong kind of client can be extremely costly for banks.

Vaccine misinformation flourishes on Facebook and Instagram weeks after promised crackdown

Misinformation about vaccines continues to thrive on Facebook and Instagram weeks after the companies vowed to reduce its distribution on their platforms.
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Business and Economics

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World

Rafi Eitan, Israeli Spymaster Who Caught Eichmann, Is Dead at 92

He led the team that seized the Nazi architect of the Final Solution in Argentina and later handled the American spy Jonathan Jay Pollard.
 
New York Times
   
 

With a Second President in Jail, Brazil’s Carwash Probe Lives on

The detention of former president Michel Temer has triggered breathless coverage, rampant speculation and mocking Tweets.
 
New York Times
   
 

Maduro Digs In. It’s an Old Strategy, but It May Work.

President Nicolás Maduro of Venezuela and the opposition leader Juan Guaidó have been playing a waiting game as each claims to be the country’s rightful leader. But Mr. Maduro seems to be taking the lead..
 
New York Times
   
 

Truck Driver in Crash That Devastated a Hockey Team Is Sentenced to 8 Years

The driver sped past five signs warning him to stop before colliding with a bus carrying the Humboldt Broncos. Sixteen people died..
 
New York Times
   
 

Antonia Rey, Latin Actress of Stage and Screen, Dies at 92

She and her husband fled Cuba under Castro, giving up their prominence in theater there. In the North, she had a steady diet of ethnic roles..
 
New York Times
   
 

Trilobites: An Elusive Whale Is Found All Around the World

Researchers are learning about a newly identified species of baleen whales, tracing sightings and sounds to learn that they stay mainly in tropical waters.
 
New York Times
   
 

What’s Going On Between Canada and China? Our Experts Share Their Thoughts.

The Times gathered four correspondents and an editor to discuss the currently fraught relations between the two nations.
 
New York Times
   
 

A Bite-Size Square of Canada’s History, Culture and Craving

How the Nanaimo bar, a three-layer no-bake treat from British Columbia, conquered a nation’s palate.
 
New York Times
   
 

The Saturday Profile: 5 Popes, 150 Papal Trips and One Stern Lecture for Bishops

The Mexican journalist Valentina Alazraki made news herself recently when she warned Roman Catholic leaders to address clerical sexual abuse — or suffer the consequences.
 
New York Times
   
 

Video Dispatch: How Maduro Keeps Power in Venezuela, Even With the Lights Out

A weeklong outage deepened the country’s already crippling economic crisis. Our reporter crossed Caracas to see its impact on residents and how they view embattled President Nicolás Maduro..
 
New York Times
   
 

Rafi Eitan, Israeli Spymaster Who Caught Eichmann, Is Dead at 92

He led the team that seized the Nazi architect of the Final Solution in Argentina and later handled the American spy Jonathan Jay Pollard.
 
New York Times
   
 

With a Second President in Jail, Brazil’s Carwash Probe Lives on

The detention of former president Michel Temer has triggered breathless coverage, rampant speculation and mocking Tweets.
 
New York Times
   
 

Maduro Digs In. It’s an Old Strategy, but It May Work.

President Nicolás Maduro of Venezuela and the opposition leader Juan Guaidó have been playing a waiting game as each claims to be the country’s rightful leader. But Mr. Maduro seems to be taking the lead..
 
New York Times
   
 

Truck Driver in Crash That Devastated a Hockey Team Is Sentenced to 8 Years

The driver sped past five signs warning him to stop before colliding with a bus carrying the Humboldt Broncos. Sixteen people died..
 
New York Times
   
 

Antonia Rey, Latin Actress of Stage and Screen, Dies at 92

She and her husband fled Cuba under Castro, giving up their prominence in theater there. In the North, she had a steady diet of ethnic roles..
 
New York Times
   
 

Trilobites: An Elusive Whale Is Found All Around the World

Researchers are learning about a newly identified species of baleen whales, tracing sightings and sounds to learn that they stay mainly in tropical waters.
 
New York Times
   
 

What’s Going On Between Canada and China? Our Experts Share Their Thoughts.

The Times gathered four correspondents and an editor to discuss the currently fraught relations between the two nations.
 
New York Times
   
 

A Bite-Size Square of Canada’s History, Culture and Craving

How the Nanaimo bar, a three-layer no-bake treat from British Columbia, conquered a nation’s palate.
 
New York Times
   
 

The Saturday Profile: 5 Popes, 150 Papal Trips and One Stern Lecture for Bishops

The Mexican journalist Valentina Alazraki made news herself recently when she warned Roman Catholic leaders to address clerical sexual abuse — or suffer the consequences.
 
New York Times
   
 

Video Dispatch: How Maduro Keeps Power in Venezuela, Even With the Lights Out

A weeklong outage deepened the country’s already crippling economic crisis. Our reporter crossed Caracas to see its impact on residents and how they view embattled President Nicolás Maduro..
 
New York Times
   
 

Business & Economics

Retirement contribution limits will rise in 2019

Good news retirement savers: The Internal Revenue Service announced cost of living increases to the contribution limits for retirement-related plans in 2019.
 
CNN
   
 

Bannon Is Out, but Economic Nationalism Still Thrives at the White House

By Linette Lopez,Business InsiderAugust 18, 2017Just because Steve Bannon is out of the White House, doesn't mean that his ideas are gone — especially when it...
 
mrainey
   
 

More Good News on Jobs Gives the Fed a Green Light to Start Unwinding

By Lucia Mutikani,ReutersAugust 17, 2017The number of Americans filing for unemployment benefits fell to near a six-month low last week, pointing to a...
 
mrainey
   
 

The Walls Are Closing In as Allies Abandon Trump

August 16, 2017Things have looked grim for Donald Trump’s future more than once in his relatively brief career as a politician...
 
jleo
   
 

Why US Coal Producers Are Having a Very Good Year

By Tom DiChristopher,CNBCAugust 16, 2017U.S. coal exports are rising this year, giving the fossil-fuel friendly Trump administration reason to cheer, but....
 
jstelzer
   
 

OK Google, Here’s Why Men and Women Are Not the Same

August 16, 2017Men and women are different. I probably won’t lose my job for saying that, but Google engineer James Damore did....
 
arader
   
 

Household Debt in the US Just Hit an All-Time High

By Jonathan Spicer,ReutersAugust 15, 2017Americans' debt level notched another record high in the second quarter, after having earlier in the year...
 
jstelzer
   
 

Multiple CEOs Have Now Quit Trump’s Manufacturing Council

By Michael Erman,ReutersAugust 15, 2017The chief executives of Intel Corp, Merck & Co Inc and Under Armour Inc resigned from U.S. President Donald....
 
jstelzer
   
 

Trump Is Headed for a Collision With the Auto Industry as NAFTA Talks Loom

By David Lawder,ReutersAugust 14, 2017The Trump administration has set a collision course with the auto industry as it launches renegotiations of the 23...
 
arader
   
 

The Republican Retreat From Market-Based Regulation

August 14, 2017During the debate over the repeal of Obamacare, Republicans made frequent reference to their desire for a “free...
 
jleo
   
 

Science & Technology

Apple’s big event

Apple is hosting a mystery spring press event on March 25, where it's expected to debut a video-streaming product. This is Apple's Hollywood moment. .
 
CNN.com - RSS Channel - App Tech Section
   
 

Pinterest files to go public. Its stock ticker? PINS


Pinterest, a service that lets users bookmark or "pin" images ranging from recipes to home design, filed paperwork to go public.
 
CNN.com - RSS Channel - App Tech Section
   
 

LAPD audit reveals dangers of high-tech policing


An audit of the Los Angeles police department is raising questions about new technologies law enforcement is using nationwide with little oversight.
 
CNN.com - RSS Channel - App Tech Section
   
 

CNN.com – RSS Channel – App Tech Section 1970-01-01 00:00:00

CNN's Oliver Darcy looks at how Twitter's algorithm is now amplifying extreme political rhetoric and conspiracy theories.
 
CNN.com - RSS Channel - App Tech Section
   
 

This 24-year-old finds unreleased features in your favorite apps


Jane Manchun Wong spends her free time reverse engineering popular apps like Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Airbnb and others, to find new features and security vulnerabilities.
 
CNN.com - RSS Channel - App Tech Section
   
 

How Twitter’s algorithm is amplifying extreme political rhetoric


Through a new feature, Twitter may at times end up amplifying inflammatory political rhetoric, misinformation, conspiracy theories, and flat out lies to its users.
 
CNN.com - RSS Channel - App Tech Section
   
 

Tesla is accusing a former employee of stealing self-driving tech and giving it to a Chinese rival


Tesla is accusing a former employee of stealing intellectual property worth hundreds of millions of dollars and sharing it with Xiaopeng Motors.
 
CNN.com - RSS Channel - App Tech Section
   
 

How 5G will transform manufacturing


5G networks that transform entertainment, communication and transportation may still be years away. But in manufacturing, the technology is already making a difference. .
 
CNN.com - RSS Channel - App Tech Section
   
 

Big banks are using AI to keep out of trouble


Doing business with the wrong kind of client can be extremely costly for banks.
 
CNN.com - RSS Channel - App Tech Section
   
 

Vaccine misinformation flourishes on Facebook and Instagram weeks after promised crackdown


Misinformation about vaccines continues to thrive on Facebook and Instagram weeks after the companies vowed to reduce its distribution on their platforms.
 
CNN.com - RSS Channel - App Tech Section
   
 

Law & Public Policy

Sorry, no posts matched your criteria.

Books & Authors

Wading Through the Sludge

According to the Office of Management and Budget, in 2015, Americans spent 9.78 billion hours on federal paperwork. The Treasury Department, including the Internal Revenue Service, accounted for the vast majority of the total: 7.36 billion hours.
 
Cass R. Sunstein
   
 

Is Tunisia Ready for Gender Equality?

On January 14, the eighth anniversary of the Tunisian revolution, I joined the crowds passing through metal detectors to gather in Tunis’s Avenue Habib Bourguiba. A few people carried pictures of protesters killed in 2011.
 
Ursula Lindsey
   
 

Race & Romance in America

When I was five and we went back to India for a visit, everyone was upset about two things. The first was that my brother and I still did not speak Malayalam.
 
Mira Jacob
   
 

The Ominous Decadence of László Nemes’s ‘Sunset’

Sunset, the forty-two-year-old French-Hungarian filmmaker László Nemes’s follow-up to his astonishing 2015 debut Son of Saul, is a gothic melodrama and a modernist period piece, set on the eve of World War I and shadowed by impending doom. Less dire than Saul but nonetheless alarming, Sunset tracks the quest of its protagonist, the young milliner Irisz Leiter (Juli Jakab), an orphan arrived in Budapest, to find employment at Leiter, the fashionable, luxury emporium founded by her parents.
 
J. Hoberman
   
 

The Chernobyl Syndrome

On the night of April 25, 1986, during a planned maintenance shutdown at the Chernobyl power plant in northern Ukraine, one of the four reactors overheated and began to burn.
 
Sophie Pinkham
   
 

What Is the World to Do About Gene-Editing?

He Jiankui’s announcement that in November that he had created the first two gene-edited humans in history was met with universal condemnation. Hundreds of Chinese scientists signed a letter calling the research “crazy,” CRISPR’s co-creator, Jennifer Doudna, said she was “horrified,” and Francis Collins, the director of the National Institutes for Health, labeled it “profoundly disturbing.” If everyone can agree He crossed some kind of line, the questions of what that line is and where it should be are still open.
 
Stephen Buranyi
   
 

Rite of Passage: Moroccan Boys Reach for Europe

“Europe would be a chance for us to work, a chance to study, a chance to learn a new language, in Spain or France, for example,” Rachid told me, one of a group of teenage Moroccan boys hoping to board the ferry from northern Africa to Europe.
 
Louis Witter
   
 

An Archive of Atrocities

Taner Akçam, a leading authority on the Armenian genocide, is unquestionably a very brave man: now based in the US, he is himself Turkish, and because of his pioneering work has long been a hated figure for the Turkish right.
 
Mark Mazower
   
 

A Minister, a General, & the Militias: Libya’s Shifting Balance of Power

Fathi Bashagha, a leading figure in the Tripoli-based Government of National Accord, is also touring Washington and European capitals, where he pleads for equipment and for help in cutting off funding to what he calls Libya’s “princes of militias.” By many accounts, these have been impressive performances and Western backers of the Government of National Accord have placed great hopes in him to restore order.
 
Frederic Wehrey
   
 

Making Good on the Broken Promise of Reparations

In fact, Union military and political leaders who were directly responsible for stewarding black people from enslavement into their new lives as freed people felt strongly that slavery was an atrocity and a theft that required compensation.
 
Katherine Franke
   
 

Articles & Opinion

Violent Far-Right Extremists Are Rarely Prosecuted as Terrorists

On a narrow street in Charlottesville, Virginia, James Alex Fields Jr. pressed the accelerator of his gray Dodge Challenger. Dozens of people were walking in front of him. They had come to protest Fields and hundreds of other white supremacists who’d descended on this pleasant Southern college town for the “Unite the Right” rally in August 2017. “Our streets!” the protesters chanted in response to the white supremacists.
 
Trevor Aaronson
   
 

The Domestic Terrorism Law the Justice Department Forgot

Glendon Scott Crawford was a mechanic at General Electric in Schenectady, New York. A tall, slender, middle-aged man with rectangular eyeglasses, he was married with three children. By appearances, he was an unremarkable middle-class American. But beneath Crawford’s vanilla exterior lurked a white supremacist angry about President Barack Obama’s election and contemptuous of upstate New York’s sizable Muslim community.
 
Trevor Aaronson
   
 

How a Movement That Never Killed Anyone Became the FBI’s No. 1 Domestic Terrorism Threat

Joe Dibee’s 12 years on the lam came to an end last August, when Cuban authorities detained the 50-year-old environmental activist during a layover in Havana and turned him over to the United States. More than a decade earlier, police and FBI agents had arrested a dozen of Dibee’s associates in the Animal Liberation Front and Earth Liberation Front within the span of a few months.
 
Alleen Brown
   
 

The Strange Tale of the FBI’s Fictional “Black Identity Extremism” Movement

Hours after police Officer Darren Wilson shot and killed 18-year-old Michael Brown on a quiet suburban street in Ferguson, Missouri, Olajuwon Ali Davis stood with a few dozen people on that same street.
 
Alice Speri
   
 

Inside the Israeli Right’s Campaign to Silence an Anti-Occupation Group

On January 12, 2016, Yuli Novak called her staff of a dozen people together in their Tel Aviv offices to reveal the identity of a spy who had infiltrated the organization.
 
Mairav Zonszein
   
 

The Secret History of Fiat Brazil’s Internal Espionage Network and Collaboration With the Military Dictatorship

In October 1978, Fiat Brazil’s workers were on the verge of . The Italian carmaker’s factory in South America would go on to become its most successful: Today, more Fiats are produced in Brazil than in any country besides Italy, and Fiats are the third most popular car in Brazil.
 
Janaina Cesar
   
 

The EPA’s Bungled Response to an Air Pollution Crisis Exposes a Toxic Racial Divide

After a crucial division of the Environmental Protection Agency reassessed the dangers of two key pollutants — ethylene oxide and chloroprene — the risk of cancer from air pollution shot up in many communities around the country.
 
Sharon Lerner
   
 

French Muslims Grapple With a Republic That Codified Their Marginalization

Yasser Louati didn’t usually permit his English students to leave class to make phone calls. On this January day in 2015, however, one asked with such urgency in her eyes that he nodded at her request and let her leave.
 
Murtaza Hussain
   
 

“I Want to Walk on the Moon While Wearing Hijab”: Syrian Women in Turkey Seek to Define Their Independence

When Yasmin, a native of the Syrian town of Douma, decided at age 35 to resume the education that had been interrupted when she married at 13, her family was incredulous.
 
Maryam Saleh
   
 

How an Undercover Oil Industry Mercenary Tricked Pipeline Opponents Into Believing He Was One of Them

Jesse Horne still struggles to talk about the day he was kicked out of the anti-Dakota Access pipeline movement. It had been an intense week. Searching for direction and ideological fulfillment ever since Iowa’s stand against the pipeline wound down, the 20-year-old had reconnected with some of the state’s more radical pipeline opponents, and the group was now taking on drone warfare.
 
Alleen Brown