Recent News

Four Top Tech C.E.O.s Will Testify on Antitrust, Panel Says

The hearing this month would be a central moment in the continuing backlash against the power of Amazon, Facebook, Alphabet and Apple.

HUD Rule Would Cut Protections for Homeless Transgender People

Homeless shelters would have the right to turn away transgender people from single-sex facilities that correspond to their gender identity.

U.S. Watchdog’s Report Faults Boeing’s Disclosures on 737 Max Software

Boeing has completed a series of test flights, but a return to the skies will depend on more safety milestones.

A Massachusetts City Decides to Recognize Polyamorous Relationships

The city of Somerville has broadened the definition of domestic partnership to include relationships between three or more adults, expanding access to health care.

It Paid Doctors Kickbacks. Now, Novartis Will Pay a $678 Million Settlement.

The pharmaceutical company spent more than $100 million on lavish meals, fishing junkets, golf outings, sporting events and speaker fees to influence doctors to prescribe its drugs, federal prosecutors said.

Afghan Contractor Handed Out Russian Cash to Kill Americans, Officials Say

A small-time businessman became a key middleman for bounties on coalition troops in Afghanistan, U.S. intelligence reports say. Friends saw him grow rich, but didn’t know how.

Trump’s New Russia Problem: Unread Intelligence and Missing Strategy

High-level clearance is not required to see that the list of Russian aggressions in recent weeks rivals some of the worst days of the Cold War.

Putin Orchestrates Russia Referendum to Keep Him in Power

Russia’s constitutional “referendum” delivered its expected outcome — President Putin can serve until 2036 — but an elaborate spectacle of public affirmation was vital to his legitimacy.
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Business and Economics

Will Europe or the US Recover Faster from Coronavirus?

The United States, with its readiness to fire and hire, normally bounces back faster after a recession. This time, though, Europe’s model may be better.

Fox News Fires Ed Henry Over Sexual Misconduct Claim

A lawyer for the veteran Washington correspondent and anchor said Mr. Henry “is confident that he will be vindicated.”

Suspension From European Airspace Is Latest Blow to Pakistan’s Troubled Airline

Pakistan International Airlines has come under fire after a May 22 crash that left 97 people dead, with an inquiry underway into 150 pilots’ credentials.

How Berkshire Hathaway May Have Been Snookered in Germany

A unit of Warren Buffett’s empire paid an inflated price for a pipe maker that used fake sales to look profitable, an arbitration panel concluded. The firm was close to bankruptcy.

Congress Extends Small-Business Loan Program for 5 Weeks

The House cleared the extension, which would give companies more time to apply for pandemic relief loans, sending it to the White House for President Trump’s signature.

5 Caribbean Vacation Destinations Reopening This Summer

As the region reopens, it faces hurricane season, pandemic-related restrictions and the absence of cruise ships.

Federal Officials Turn to a New Testing Strategy as Infections Surge

Millions of additional coronavirus tests may be processed with “pooling,” enabling widespread surveillance as the country struggles to reopen.

He Says a Union Fired Him Over His Push for Police Reform

A clash at a Maryland local shows the tensions in a labor movement whose ranks include law enforcement officers along with many nonwhite, nonpolice members.
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Books and Authors

A Shuttered Garage, a Devastated Trade

The taxi industry has been brutally crunched on two sides—from skyrocketing operating costs, on the one hand, and a sharp decline in business, on the other. When the bubble burst in late 2014, the value of medallions crashed, leaving drivers with no savings and deep in debt. A rash of suicides among them has followed. At the same time, those already struggling to repay loans found their income drastically reduced by competition from Uber and other ridesharing companies. Erick Castro is left shaking his head, wondering why one of the city’s most faithful and enduring modes of transportation has been the one to go.

He Made Stone Speak

Because all creative people start out as young people, we have a tendency to ascribe creativity to youth itself, but mature masters like Michelangelo remind us that the urge to create has nothing to do with age or the lack of it, but rather with that inventive spirit both he and Vasari called ingegno—inborn wit, cleverness, genius. The spirit often manifests young, but like wine and wood, it depends on age to reveal its full complexity. When Michelangelo turned seventy, as he does at the beginning of William Wallace’s Michelangelo, God’s Architect, he had nineteen more years to live, every one of them spent at work.

The Films of Women’s Liberation

An exceptional series currently streaming on the Criterion Channel, “Tell Me: Women Filmmakers, Women’s Stories,” is an occasion to reconsider the ranging paths of feminist media production stoked by women’s liberation in the early 1970s. Originally curated by Nellie Killian for a Metrograph run in 2018, the series spans four decades of documentaries made by women, many of which were distributed by feminist and leftist collectives during the 1970s and 1980s.

Pulling Down ‘the Wall of No’ on Police Reform in Minneapolis

Lena K. Gardner, a co-founder of the Black Visions Collective, found her early engagements with city politicians, including her councilman, Jacob Frey, who is now the city’s beleaguered mayor, were deeply frustrating. “I called it ‘the Wall of No,’” she recalled, of their categorical resistance to reforms. “They were so constrained by ideas of scarcity, of what’s possible, that they failed to realize how bad the police really were,” she said. “So it’s mind-boggling to hear the same city council leaders saying that the things that were ‘impossible’ four years ago are now possible.”

A Legacy of Torture in Chicago

Chicago has a police torture problem. The exact size of this problem is not known and perhaps never will be. What is known for sure is that between 1972 and 1991 at least 125 black Chicagoans were tortured by police officers in the Area 2 precinct building on the city’s predominantly black South Side. Depending on the day and the officers involved, the victims were beaten, shackled to steaming hot radiators, electrocuted, and raped with sex toys. They were tortured into confessing, and sometimes tortured more afterward; these confessions were used to send them to prison, and in some cases to death row. During the recent wave of protests set off by the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis, it was obvious that, for many in Chicago, the city’s legacy of police torture was a palpable presence, informing the protesters’ anger—but also their anxiety about the fate of their arrested comrades.

Richard Wright, Masaoka Shiki, and the Haiku of Confinement

Bedridden in his Odéon apartment, Richard Wright—author of the 1940 novel Native Son and the autobiographical Black Boy (1945), his searing account of growing up in the Jim Crow South—spent the last year and a half of his life, before his death in 1960 at the age of fifty-two, writing haiku: “The sound of the rain / Blotted out now and then / By a sticky cough.”

Indulging with Control in Fiction

Characters dream of solving their problems by becoming more controlled and many have delusions of “election”—the sense of oneself as “chosen,” “special,” a celebrity perhaps. “For a man of his age, fifty-two, divorced, he has, to his mind, solved the problem of sex rather well,” Coetzee opens his great novel Disgrace. The aspiration is to indulge always with control, without being overwhelmed. The reader knows that is not going to happen.

Britain’s Colonial Legacy on Trial at The Hague

This legacy—of Britain's slavery and colonialism, racism and empire—that had been delicately skipped over in my classes soon came ever more sharply into focus for me, not least through the legal cases in which I became professionally involved. The world as it was taught to me and the world as I experienced it were, I came to see, miles apart. British exceptionalism was, well, just part of the natural order.
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United States

It Paid Doctors Kickbacks. Now, Novartis Will Pay a $678 Million Settlement.


The pharmaceutical company spent more than $100 million on lavish meals, fishing junkets, golf outings, sporting events and speaker fees to influence doctors to prescribe its drugs, federal prosecutors said.
 
New York Times
   
 

A Massachusetts City Decides to Recognize Polyamorous Relationships


The city of Somerville has broadened the definition of domestic partnership to include relationships between three or more adults, expanding access to health care.
 
New York Times
   
 

U.S. Watchdog’s Report Faults Boeing’s Disclosures on 737 Max Software


Boeing has completed a series of test flights, but a return to the skies will depend on more safety milestones.
 
New York Times
   
 

Trump Attacks a Suburban Housing Program. Critics See a Play for White Votes.


Proponents of the policy saw the move as an attempt to shore up the president’s sagging support among white suburban voters by stoking racial division.
 
New York Times
   
 

Private and Religious School Backers See Broad Victory in Supreme Court Decision


The court drew its decision narrowly when ruling against a Montana tax break that excluded religious schools. But denominational school advocates will push a broad application..
 
New York Times
   
 

HUD Rule Would Cut Protections for Homeless Transgender People


Homeless shelters would have the right to turn away transgender people from single-sex facilities that correspond to their gender identity.
 
New York Times
   
 

HUD Rule Would Dismantle Protections for Homeless Transgender People


Homeless shelters would have the right to turn away transgender people from single-sex facilities that correspond to their gender identity.
 
New York Times
   
 

Slotkin, Former Intelligence Briefer, Presses White House on Russia Reports


The first-term congresswoman’s experience as an intelligence official told her there was something very unusual in the way the White House handled disturbing reports on Russia.
 
New York Times
   
 

PG&E, Troubled California Utility, Emerges From Bankruptcy


The company, which has a new board and chief executive, said it had put $5.4 billion and its stock in a trust for victims of wildfires started by its equipment.
 
New York Times
   
 

In Wisconsin, Every Ruling on Voting Counts


Two critical court decisions gave both parties hope in a state where election margins are often razor thin.
 
New York Times
   
 

It Paid Doctors Kickbacks. Now, Novartis Will Pay a $678 Million Settlement.

The pharmaceutical company spent more than $100 million on lavish meals, fishing junkets, golf outings, sporting events and speaker fees to influence doctors to prescribe its drugs, federal prosecutors said.
 
New York Times
   
 

A Massachusetts City Decides to Recognize Polyamorous Relationships

The city of Somerville has broadened the definition of domestic partnership to include relationships between three or more adults, expanding access to health care.
 
New York Times
   
 

U.S. Watchdog’s Report Faults Boeing’s Disclosures on 737 Max Software

Boeing has completed a series of test flights, but a return to the skies will depend on more safety milestones.
 
New York Times
   
 

Trump Attacks a Suburban Housing Program. Critics See a Play for White Votes.

Proponents of the policy saw the move as an attempt to shore up the president’s sagging support among white suburban voters by stoking racial division.
 
New York Times
   
 

Private and Religious School Backers See Broad Victory in Supreme Court Decision

The court drew its decision narrowly when ruling against a Montana tax break that excluded religious schools. But denominational school advocates will push a broad application..
 
New York Times
   
 

HUD Rule Would Cut Protections for Homeless Transgender People

Homeless shelters would have the right to turn away transgender people from single-sex facilities that correspond to their gender identity.
 
New York Times
   
 

HUD Rule Would Dismantle Protections for Homeless Transgender People

Homeless shelters would have the right to turn away transgender people from single-sex facilities that correspond to their gender identity.
 
New York Times
   
 

Slotkin, Former Intelligence Briefer, Presses White House on Russia Reports

The first-term congresswoman’s experience as an intelligence official told her there was something very unusual in the way the White House handled disturbing reports on Russia.
 
New York Times
   
 

PG&E, Troubled California Utility, Emerges From Bankruptcy

The company, which has a new board and chief executive, said it had put $5.4 billion and its stock in a trust for victims of wildfires started by its equipment.
 
New York Times
   
 

In Wisconsin, Every Ruling on Voting Counts

Two critical court decisions gave both parties hope in a state where election margins are often razor thin.
 
New York Times
   
 

World

Afghan Contractor Handed Out Russian Cash to Kill Americans, Officials Say


A small-time businessman became a key middleman for bounties on coalition troops in Afghanistan, U.S. intelligence reports say. Friends saw him grow rich, but didn’t know how..
 
New York Times
   
 

Coronavirus Live Updates: U.S. Sets New Single-Day Case Record


President Trump said he believes the virus will “sort of just disappear.” On Capitol Hill, more Republicans are recommending masks. Iranian officials announced new shutdown measures in 11 provinces..
 
New York Times
   
 

Late Action on Virus Prompts Fears Over Safety of U.S. Diplomats in Saudi Arabia


Surging outbreaks in the U.S. Embassy and the kingdom and quiet congressional pressure led the State Department belatedly to allow voluntary departures. Some demand more action..
 
New York Times
   
 

‘We Have to Act Out Our Freedom’: Protesters Hit Streets in Hong Kong


Hong Kong police invoked Beijing’s new security law for the first time to arrest protesters on the anniversary of the city’s handover to China.
 
New York Times
   
 

Your Thursday Briefing


Hong Kong law, Uighurs, Seattle: Here’s what you need to know.
 
New York Times
   
 

A Lost Dog’s Brief Stint as Brazil’s Presidential Mascot

A white dog, found near the presidential palace, soon became the presidential mascot, and an Instagram star. But his brief brush with fame came to a quick end — though a happy one..
 
New York Times
   
 

Rev. Georg Ratzinger, Choirmaster and a Pope’s Brother, Dies at 96


Father Ratzinger, a trained musician, pursued a career far away from the world of the Vatican and the future Pope Benedict XVI.
 
New York Times
   
 

Hong Kong’s New Weapon Against Protesters: A Purple Warning Flag


The police have long used color-coded banners to warn demonstrators, but the wording on the new flag was a stark reminder of the drastic changes.
 
New York Times
   
 

In Japan, the Message of Anti-Racism Protests Fails to Hit Home


A view that institutional racism is a faraway problem is keeping the country from more fully confronting entrenched discrimination.
 
New York Times
   
 

Hong Kong’s Security Law Brings the Beijing Treatment


With the passage of the national security law, pro-democracy activists face the same dilemma as their mainland counterparts: choosing between fear and their ideals.
 
New York Times
   
 

Afghan Contractor Handed Out Russian Cash to Kill Americans, Officials Say


A small-time businessman became a key middleman for bounties on coalition troops in Afghanistan, U.S. intelligence reports say. Friends saw him grow rich, but didn’t know how..
 
New York Times
   
 

Coronavirus Live Updates: U.S. Sets New Single-Day Case Record


President Trump said he believes the virus will “sort of just disappear.” On Capitol Hill, more Republicans are recommending masks. Iranian officials announced new shutdown measures in 11 provinces..
 
New York Times
   
 

Late Action on Virus Prompts Fears Over Safety of U.S. Diplomats in Saudi Arabia


Surging outbreaks in the U.S. Embassy and the kingdom and quiet congressional pressure led the State Department belatedly to allow voluntary departures. Some demand more action..
 
New York Times
   
 

‘We Have to Act Out Our Freedom’: Protesters Hit Streets in Hong Kong


Hong Kong police invoked Beijing’s new security law for the first time to arrest protesters on the anniversary of the city’s handover to China.
 
New York Times
   
 

Your Thursday Briefing


Hong Kong law, Uighurs, Seattle: Here’s what you need to know.
 
New York Times
   
 

A Lost Dog’s Brief Stint as Brazil’s Presidential Mascot

A white dog, found near the presidential palace, soon became the presidential mascot, and an Instagram star. But his brief brush with fame came to a quick end — though a happy one..
 
New York Times
   
 

Rev. Georg Ratzinger, Choirmaster and a Pope’s Brother, Dies at 96


Father Ratzinger, a trained musician, pursued a career far away from the world of the Vatican and the future Pope Benedict XVI.
 
New York Times
   
 

Hong Kong’s New Weapon Against Protesters: A Purple Warning Flag


The police have long used color-coded banners to warn demonstrators, but the wording on the new flag was a stark reminder of the drastic changes.
 
New York Times
   
 

In Japan, the Message of Anti-Racism Protests Fails to Hit Home


A view that institutional racism is a faraway problem is keeping the country from more fully confronting entrenched discrimination.
 
New York Times
   
 

Hong Kong’s Security Law Brings the Beijing Treatment


With the passage of the national security law, pro-democracy activists face the same dilemma as their mainland counterparts: choosing between fear and their ideals.
 
New York Times
   
 

Business & Economics

How Berkshire Hathaway May Have Been Snookered in Germany


A unit of Warren Buffett’s empire paid an inflated price for a pipe maker that used fake sales to look profitable, an arbitration panel concluded. The firm was close to bankruptcy..
 
New York Times
   
 

Federal Reserve Minutes Show a Litany of Reasons to Worry About Economy


Minutes from the Federal Reserve’s June meeting show that officials remained seriously concerned, even as states reopened.
 
New York Times
   
 

Congress Extends Small-Business Loan Program for 5 Weeks


The House cleared the extension, which would give companies more time to apply for pandemic relief loans, sending it to the White House for President Trump’s signature.
 
New York Times
   
 

He Says a Union Fired Him Over His Push for Police Reform


A clash at a Maryland local shows the tensions in a labor movement whose ranks include law enforcement officers along with many nonwhite, nonpolice members.
 
New York Times
   
 

Federal Officials Turn to a New Testing Strategy as Infections Surge


Millions of additional coronavirus tests may be processed with “pooling,” enabling widespread surveillance as the country struggles to reopen.
 
New York Times
   
 

New York City Cuts Arts Spending by 11 Percent to Close Budget Gap


Facing a $9 billion loss in tax revenues, city leaders cut agency spending across the board, including the Department of Cultural Affairs.
 
New York Times
   
 

The Music Industry Is Wrestling With Race. Here’s What It Has Promised.


The business owes much of its wealth to the work of Black artists but has just a handful of Black executives in its most senior jobs. Companies large and small say they’re devoted to change..
 
New York Times
   
 

Researchers Debate Infecting People on Purpose to Test Coronavirus Vaccines


The technique, called a human challenge trial, has been used to evaluate other vaccines.
 
New York Times
   
 

Anders Ericsson, Psychologist and ‘Expert on Experts,’ Dies at 72


His research helped inspire “Outliers,” Malcolm Gladwell’s best-selling book on the keys to excelling.
 
New York Times
   
 

5 Caribbean Vacation Destinations Reopening This Summer


As the region reopens, it faces hurricane season, pandemic-related restrictions and the absence of cruise ships.
 
New York Times
   
 

Science & Technology

Four Top Tech C.E.O.s Will Testify on Antitrust, Panel Says


The hearing this month would be a central moment in the continuing backlash against the power of Amazon, Facebook, Alphabet and Apple.
 
David McCabe
   
 

California sues Cisco for alleged discrimination against employee because of caste

California authorities are suing Cisco and two of its employees for allegedly discriminating against an Indian engineer because he was from a lower caste than them.
 
CNN.com - RSS Channel - App Tech Section
   
 

These are the big brands that haven’t pulled ads from Facebook yet

Hundreds of companies have promised to halt advertising on Facebook and its sibling platform Instagram as part of month-long boycott officially set to begin on Wednesday, according to the civil rights groups behind the protest.
 
CNN.com - RSS Channel - App Tech Section
   
 

Advertisers have Facebook’s attention. Now here’s what they want

Facebook is about to look a little different, whether users notice or not.
 
CNN.com - RSS Channel - App Tech Section
   
 

Bogus Ideas Have Superspreaders, Too


Internet companies should treat people with big followings differently.
 
Shira Ovide
   
 

How to Make Smartphones Last Longer


In a pandemic-induced recession, it’s more important than ever to take care of our smartphones and other gadgets.
 
Brian X. Chen
   
 

China’s Software Stalked Uighurs Earlier and More Widely, Researchers Learn


A new report revealed a broad campaign that targeted Muslims in China and their diaspora in other countries, beginning as early as 2013.
 
Paul Mozur and Nicole Perlroth
   
 

Here’s how big Facebook’s ad business really is

Each day, more household names join the list of brands suspending advertising on Facebook to protest what they say are the social network's failures to stop the spread of hate.
 
CNN.com - RSS Channel - App Tech Section
   
 

An internal Amazon memo shows how closely it’s tracking coronavirus data at warehouses

For months, Amazon has refused to reveal data on the number of coronavirus cases inside its warehouses by claiming the data itself "isn't particularly useful," frustrating workers and critics hoping for a clearer picture of infections within what have become critical hubs for home supplies.
 
CNN.com - RSS Channel - App Tech Section
   
 

Advertiser Exodus Snowballs as Facebook Struggles to Ease Concerns


The social network has tried striking a more conciliatory tone with its advertisers, who object to its handling of hate speech.
 
Tiffany Hsu and Mike Isaac
   
 

Law & Public Policy

Breaking News

SCOTUS holds that bankruptcy court’s denial of debtor’s repayment plan is not immediately appealable. No more opinions for two weeks. The post . .
 
Andrew Hamm
   
 

Breaking News

The 1 and only, per J. Thomas: Petitioners’ lawsuit is not barred by the Tax Injunction Act. The post . .
 
Andrew Hamm
   
 

Breaking news

ed cert. in two cases:  Ocasio v United States, on extortion conspiracy, and Hawkins v Community Bank of Raymore, on spousal guarantors on credit applications. The post . .
 
Andrew Hamm
   
 

Breaking News

The opinion in . The Court rejects prosecution of fisherman for discarding undersized fish, 5-4. The opinion in . The Court rejects state action antitrust immunity for NC Dental Board because it isn’t supervised enough by state government, 6-3.   The post . .
 
Andrew Hamm
   
 

Breaking News

The opinion in .   The post .
 
Andrew Hamm
   
 

Breaking News

The orders are . There are no new grants or CVSGs. The post . .
 
Andrew Hamm
   
 

Breaking News

The orders are . There are no new grants or CVSGs. The decision in . The post . .
 
Andrew Hamm
   
 

Breaking News

The opinion in . Per J. Sotomayor, trademark tacking is a jury question. The opinion in . Per J. Ginsburg, dismissal of an action in multidistrict litigation triggers a right to appeal. The opinion in .
 
Andrew Hamm
   
 

Breaking News

The orders list is . There are no new grants or CVSGs. Review denied on battlefield contractors and generic drugs. The opinion in ; prison may not prohibit 1/2 inch beard compelled by religious beliefs. The summary reversal in Christesen, a capital case, is . The opinion in .
 
Andrew Hamm
   
 

Breaking News

The opinion in The Court holds that localities must explain denials of permission to build cell phone towers. The opinion in . The Court holds that a habeas petitioner who wins does not have to file notice of appeal to preserve winning theory on appeal.   The post . .
 
Andrew Hamm
   
 

Books & Authors

A Shuttered Garage, a Devastated Trade


The taxi industry has been brutally crunched on two sides—from skyrocketing operating costs, on the one hand, and a sharp decline in business, on the other. When the bubble burst in late 2014, the value of medallions crashed, leaving drivers with no savings and deep in debt.
 
Willa Glickman, Phil Penman
   
 

He Made Stone Speak


Because all creative people start out as young people, we have a tendency to ascribe creativity to youth itself, but mature masters like Michelangelo remind us that the urge to create has nothing to do with age or the lack of it, but rather with that inventive spirit both he and Vasari called ingegno—inborn wit, cleverness, genius.
 
Ingrid D. Rowland
   
 

The Films of Women’s Liberation


An exceptional series currently streaming on the Criterion Channel, “Tell Me: Women Filmmakers, Women’s Stories,” is an occasion to reconsider the ranging paths of feminist media production stoked by women’s liberation in the early 1970s.
 
Phoebe Chen
   
 

Pulling Down ‘the Wall of No’ on Police Reform in Minneapolis


Lena K. Gardner, a co-founder of the Black Visions Collective, found her early engagements with city politicians, including her councilman, Jacob Frey, who is now the city’s beleaguered mayor, were deeply frustrating.
 
Krithika Varagur
   
 

A Legacy of Torture in Chicago


Chicago has a police torture problem. The exact size of this problem is not known and perhaps never will be. What is known for sure is that between 1972 and 1991 at least 125 black Chicagoans were tortured by police officers in the Area 2 precinct building on the city’s predominantly black South Side.
 
Peter C. Baker
   
 

Richard Wright, Masaoka Shiki, and the Haiku of Confinement


Bedridden in his Odéon apartment, Richard Wright—author of the 1940 novel Native Son and the autobiographical Black Boy (1945), his searing account of growing up in the Jim Crow South—spent the last year and a half of his life, before his death in 1960 at the age of fifty-two, writing haiku: “The sound of the rain / Blotted out now and then / By a sticky cough.”
 
Christopher Benfey
   
 

Indulging with Control in Fiction


Characters dream of solving their problems by becoming more controlled and many have delusions of “election”—the sense of oneself as “chosen,” “special,” a celebrity perhaps. “For a man of his age, fifty-two, divorced, he has, to his mind, solved the problem of sex rather well,” Coetzee opens his great novel Disgrace.
 
Tim Parks
   
 

Britain’s Colonial Legacy on Trial at The Hague


This legacy—of Britain's slavery and colonialism, racism and empire—that had been delicately skipped over in my classes soon came ever more sharply into focus for me, not least through the legal cases in which I became professionally involved.
 
Philippe Sands
   
 

American Fascism: It Has Happened Here


“When Americans think of dictators they always think of some foreign model,” wrote the anti-fascist journalist Dorothy Thompson in the mid-1930s, but an American dictator would be “one of the boys, and he will stand for everything traditionally American.” And the American people, Thompson added, “will greet him with one great big, universal, democratic, sheeplike bleat of ‘O.K., Chief! Fix it like you wanna, Chief!’” A few years later, Thompson said she was reminded of what the Louisiana populist Huey Long had once explained to her: “American Fascism would never emerge as a Fascist but as a 100 percent American movement.”
 
Sarah Churchwell
   
 

What Is College Worth?


We like to imagine college as an egalitarian force, which reduces the gap between rich and poor. But over the past four decades it has mostly served to reinforce or even to widen that gap.
 
Jonathan Zimmerman
   
 

Articles & Opinion

How the NYPD Weaponized a Curfew Against Protesters and Residents

Husan Blue, his family, and his neighbors were having a cookout on the patio outside their apartment in Crown Heights. It was a warm summer night in Brooklyn. Little kids were running around and playing.
 
Ryan Devereaux
   
 

How Trump’s Deportation Flights Are Putting Latin America and the Caribbean at Risk

Jude said his body ached, and he was feverish. The 40-year-old was being held with dozens of other Haitians in a crowded U.S.
 
Melissa del Bosque
   
 

How the Fed Bailed Out the Investor Class Without Spending a Cent

March 23, 2020 was a critical day in U.S. history, though at the time it felt like another 24 hours on the road to pandemic apocalypse.
 
David Dayen
   
 

Amid Allegations of Sexual Impropriety, Excessive Drinking, and Power Politics, a Veterans Group Wages Civil War

Aprominent veterans’ group doing relief work on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic has quietly gone to war with itself in federal court, with two branches of the organization suing each other amid allegations of sexual misconduct at an alcohol-fueled retreat last summer. Founded in 2010, Team Rubicon mobilizes military veterans and other volunteers skilled as first responders to do disaster relief.
 
Alex Emmons
   
 

Under Cover of Mass Death, Andrew Cuomo Calls in the Billionaires to Build a High-Tech Dystopia

For a few fleeting moments during New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s daily coronavirus briefing on Wednesday, the somber grimace that has filled our screens for weeks was briefly replaced by something resembling a smile. “We are ready, we’re all-in,” the governor .
 
Naomi Klein
   
 

As Africa Drowns in Garbage, the Plastic Business Keeps Booming

Rosemary Nyambura spends her weekends collecting plastic with her aunt Miriam in the Dandora dump in Nairobi. Because the bottles they sell to other plastics traders are mixed in with discarded syringes, broken glass, feces, fragments of cellphone cases, remote controls, shoe soles, trinkets, toys, pouches, clamshells, bags, and countless unrecognizable shreds of thin plastic film, the work is time-consuming and dangerous.
 
Sharon Lerner
   
 

Leaked Intelligence Cables Detail a Secret Propaganda War Between Iranian Spies and Exiled Militant Group

In a ward of Gohardasht Prison, a sprawling detention facility in a western suburb of Tehran, a few inmates gathered one night in late 2014 to remember a fallen comrade. Ali Saremi, a supporter of the Mojahedin-e Khalq, or MEK, had been executed four years earlier at another Iranian prison for his allegiance to the militant dissident group, which is considered a terrorist organization in Iran.
 
Murtaza Hussain
   
 

TikTok Told Moderators to Suppress Posts by “Ugly” People and the Poor to Attract New Users

The makers of TikTok, the Chinese video-sharing app with hundreds of millions of users around the world, instructed moderators to suppress posts created by users deemed too ugly, poor, or disabled for the platform, according to internal documents obtained by The Intercept.
 
Sam Biddle
   
 

The Secret History of U.S. Involvement in Brazil’s Scandal-Wracked Operation Car Wash

Leaked conversations between Brazilian officials reveal the inner workings of a secretive collaboration with the U.S. Department of Justice on a sprawling anti-corruption effort known as Operation Car Wash. The chats, analyzed in partnership with the Brazilian investigative news outlet Agência Pública, show that the Brazilians were extremely accommodating to their U.S.
 
Andrew Fishman
   
 

The Far Right Loves to Hate Sanders Surrogate Linda Sarsour, and She “Has the Wounds to Prove It”

On February 11, the night Bernie Sanders won the New Hampshire primary, Linda Sarsour was in Queens, New York, vying on his behalf for an endorsement from the presidential candidate. Sarsour, a Sanders campaign surrogate and executive director of Muslim social justice group , was speaking to club membership on home turf.
 
Alex Kane